Originally, the invention of bank note machines was a failure

Originally, the invention of bank note machines was a failure

One of the first machines automatically handling banknotes, installed in 1960 in a bank of New York, did not give tickets. It allowed you to deposit cash or checks on your bank account automatically. A snapshot of the deposit was then given as a receipt. In 1967 a ticket machine was installed in Enfield, a suburb of London, introducing in passing the principle of the four-digit code to identify itself on the device. He did not use plastic cards, but paper vouchers printed in radioactive ink, and removed a maximum of £ 10 at a time. Distributors using magnetic cards will appear in 1969 on Long Island. In France, the first ATM machine was installed in 1968 in the city of Marseille.

But these devices were not immediately popular, on the contrary: their invention was considered a failure, soon after the first installations. They were little used and soon had a bad reputation. The few users were indeed considered as infrequent or marginalized by society, because they would seek by this means to avoid direct contact with people at the counters. Investment in these machines was considered unprofitable. This changed from the late 1960s onwards. More and more people were beginning to trust technology and were seduced by their self-service practicality.

Although their use has declined in recent years, vending machines are still in widespread use. To remain profitable, some machines try to diversify by offering all kinds of services, from plane tickets to cinema tickets and medicines.

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